Professor Paddle: Rescue/repair/bailout kit
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jP
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  Quote jP Replybullet Posted: 14 Feb 2009 at 4:35pm
Ok Ok.
Seriously though I do like this thread (at least topic and the contributions of those who've stayed on topic.)
 
I'm doing the dual nalgene "dry" storage: one bottle on either side of seat, packed as evenly as possible. These nalgenes are the cheap white plastic ones with the traditional blue caps, surrounded by foam to further chock up the sides of my seat. It's good to fill out the space between your seat andf the walls of your boat to protect the fastening points of your seat to the boat.
 
As for the professor: what-- you think you can "Out-grump" me huh? Good luck with that. 
 
As far as Leif's boof, I'm sure it was Photoshopped--. Just kidding, Leif! I believe the photo to be authentic, but a video would be undeniable proof of the boof. I've seen logs "autoboof" before, you know.
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jP
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  Quote jP Replybullet Posted: 23 Feb 2009 at 1:32pm
So last weekend I actually packed a first aide kit. A really small ouch pouch.
 
And guess what? I actually got to bust it out for someone. Someone who I'd classify as a very solid boater (understatement) got pinned in a class II spot on an inocculous looking log.
 
Another really good boater just earned some hero points, too, because without his help, we may have been reading about a serious accident.
 
As it worked out, the pinned paddler  was dislodged and suffered only a few cuts on his hand. Still, it was at the beginning of a very demanding run. I'm glad I was able to provide for his comfort. One of my New Years Resolutions is to be a little better prepared for the unexpected, which is why I think this thread rocks!
 
Maybe something akin to a sticky thread is in order.
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James
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  Quote James Replybullet Posted: 23 Feb 2009 at 3:19pm
Ding Ding - Stickied
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franzhorner
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  Quote franzhorner Replybullet Posted: 24 Feb 2009 at 12:15pm
I just got a new first aid kit from Adventure Medical Kits.  I went with the light kit developed by guides in Yosemite.  It will fit nicely in a small ammo can which I have painted white with red crosses and should be attached to my cataraft at all times.  Also in the can will be firestarter, flashlight and whatever else I can fit in there....

MORE RAIN PLEASE
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jimwarlick
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  Quote jimwarlick Replybullet Posted: 22 Sep 2009 at 9:00pm
My suggestion:  A headlamp carried on your body will still be available for the hike out after a swim/lost boat episode. 

     I knew some guys that spent the night out after swimming and losing their boats.   Their "survival" stuff, including headlamps, was in their boats and thus lost.  Their episode generated a nasty and unnecessary SAR response when a worried friend called 911 instead of gathering a paddler possee to hike in there.  With a light, they could have easily hiked to the car.  With a flashlight, you will just about never need all of the "survival" stuff. 

     Anecdotally, I once found that a space blanket is not that warm and that was at 60 deg not raining/no wind.  I didn't last the night.  It could keep rain and wind off, though.  Sitting still to use it will just make you colder.  I think the two warmest places to be overnight on a river are in the boat with the skirt on, or continually walking around until sunrise.

     Starting a fire in the northwest in the winter can be about impossible, although the esbit tabs are good.    The underside of larger downed trees can contain dry wood.  Mostly, everything is damp.

Hoping to be helpful....Jim
    
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dblanchard
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  Quote dblanchard Replybullet Posted: 04 Dec 2009 at 11:03am
I have found what I consider the ideal container for first aid/repair/bailout kits. I'm going to order some in the next week or and thought the rest of you might want to look at them.

They are manufactured by CurTec (in Holland, I think).
http://www.curtec.com/en/products/subcat/packo-2/2/9/7

The US distributor only carries up to the 1000 cc size, though I'd really like a couple 1300 cc bottles.

Marty Kapp
General Container Corp.
mkapp@generalcontainer.com
www.generalcontainer.com
Ph:   +732-435-0020
FAX: +732-435-0040

The one liter bottles are $2.25/each; I doubt shipping will add much to that.

I keep my first aid kit in a little roll of fabric so that I can dump it out of my bottle and unroll it and see everything I have without spilling everything all over the ground.

These bottles have no interior lip like my Nalgene bottle does, so dumping my contents out won't be hindered.

Also, these open with a quarter turn and can't be tightened more than a quarter turn. This makes it faster to open, but more importantly means that anyone should be able to open one even after jP has tightened it down.

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ENDO
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  Quote ENDO Replybullet Posted: 07 Jun 2010 at 5:16pm
Has anyone mentioned a small pulley? When you are lowering or raising a boat out of a canyon, a small pulley that fits to your throw rope can make it easier. Yes, you can usually just use a tree, but at times it just helps to have one. I carry one along with 4 carabiners. Never used them, but rather have them than be stuck without.
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thad2000
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  Quote thad2000 Replybullet Posted: 20 Jul 2011 at 6:41pm
you tube suggestion was to use the ones that screw closed so they can't accidentally grab onto something.
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thad2000
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  Quote thad2000 Replybullet Posted: 20 Jul 2011 at 6:44pm
I was referring to carabiners on life jackets...
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warlickone
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  Quote warlickone Replybullet Posted: 31 Jul 2011 at 1:34am
In my personal gallery I have photos of what I carry...check it out...

First Aid in an "aloksak" drybag bought from Aquasports in Redmond (ultralight)

athletic tape/duct tape
band aids
surgicel absorbable hemostat (to shove in a wound to promote clotting)
dermabond skin glue (to close or cover wounds)
tincture of benzoin (to make tape stick better)
steri strips (to close wounds)
alcohol pads (to clean oil off of skin so tape sticks)
needle and thread (to fix torn drytops)
compass (little one the size of a dime)
Espit fuel tabs and lighter (firestarter)
paper/pen (to describe location/injuries for anyone hiking out for help)
Percocet

(I feel, for first aid, very basic is ok. Control Bleeing, treat pain, make fire for cold folks, and lots of tape to make splints and such, with tape you can do anything)

Z drag:

2 Petzl locking HMS carabiners
2 black diamond oval carabiners
3 Petzl pulley wheels
2 Petzl tibloc ascenders
1 Petzl Traxion pulley/ascender
1 anchor sling/runner

I carry the following on my lifejacket so if I lose my boat I can ->

1. hike out in the dark
2. build a fire
3. z-drag or ascend a rope lowered into a canyon to me

in lifejacket:

waterproof princeton tec headlamp
esbit tablets and lighter firestarter in multi-ziplocs (could vacuum seal)
15 feet webbing and biner
3:1 z drag kit (leaving extra mech advantage ascender/pulley/biner in boat)

I also carry spectra throwbags and a breakdown paddle. Spectra is important, as I've broken ropes z-dragging rafts. They failed by melting at the knot, so it's good to use figure eights when loading things up big.

The spectra kayak bags usually have 5/16" rope. This converts to 8mm. The Petzl ascender gear is designed to work with ropes down to 8mm.
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warlickone
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  Quote warlickone Replybullet Posted: 31 Jul 2011 at 1:49am
Opinion: It's important to have the z-drag gear and technique wired and fast.

I've known of two guys in West Virginia that have died when they were pinned underwater in their boats. Their partners setup z drags and successfully freed them. The time to setup the z drag and free them was too long though and CPR was unsuccessful. Speed and having it well practiced is important.

The case the other day of the guy that pinned in shark rapid on the Cooper is a good example. If he had not been able to exit the boat, a well rehearsed z drag may have saved him.

I hear a lot of people say you don't really need a z drag, and I agree with going simple and using the hand of god first. But a well rehearsed z drag could save a life someday.
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warlickone
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  Quote warlickone Replybullet Posted: 31 Jul 2011 at 2:29am
For those carrying harness and belay device: Unnecessary...

Belay device can be replaced with a knot called the "munter hitch". A good one to know.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Munter_hitch

A harness can be made out of the webbing you carry as a "flip line". Also, just a four foot piece of webbing/rope can be tied around your waist as a traditional "swami belt". Early climbers climbed with simply rope tied around their waist. For emergency usage, a loop around the waist will do.

With the loop of rope around the waist, one carabiner (preferably locking), and the munter hitch -> you're rappeling and belaying

If you don't have a locking carabiner, used two carabiners "opposite and opposed"....

See my gallery for a picture of this...
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warlickone
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  Quote warlickone Replybullet Posted: 31 Jul 2011 at 2:37am
You can also ascend a rope with the munter hitch and one prussic or tibloc and a foot loop (could be the end of the primary rope) . Good trick to know.

This would be useful if you were stuck in a canyon/pothole and your friends dropped a rope from the rim to you.
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sbeck206
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  Quote sbeck206 Replybullet Posted: 08 May 2012 at 11:56am
I'm in the process of putting a z-drag/unpin kit together to take when I IK. What are the bare essentials? How much rope should I carry? Is my 75 ft throw bag enough? Also, what kind of rope is best? Does it have to be floating rope or will basic climbing rope do the trick?
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