Professor Paddle: Sherpa VS Stikine
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megspk
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  Quote megspk Replybullet Topic: Sherpa VS Stikine
    Posted: 21 Feb 2017 at 11:50am
I'd like your comments, suggestions, personal preferences, and opinions!

I currently paddle a Sherpa blade from Werner, but I'm looking at getting the Stikine. I think the Stikine blade seems a bit smaller?? Is this correct?

I've trialed a Stikine before and it felt really slicey and nice in the water. The Sherpa seems to be a great blade too, but flutters a bit more (could be my door trim contributing).

How does the foam core fair in terms of durability with our rocky rivers? My Sherpa blade is still going strong and I bought that back in 2013. I just want to make sure I'm getting the best, most durable paddle!

So Sherpa Carbon VS Stikine....what do you all think?

Cheers!
A strong person and a waterfall always channel their own path. -Unknown

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megspk
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  Quote megspk Replybullet Posted: 21 Feb 2017 at 12:39pm
I guess my biggest question would be will have a smaller surface area paddle blade affect my paddling greatly?
A strong person and a waterfall always channel their own path. -Unknown

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Slackkinhard
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  Quote Slackkinhard Replybullet Posted: 21 Feb 2017 at 1:20pm
I had a Stikine....lost it on the Lochsa last spring, but the moment I got a hold of the bigger bladed powerhouse, I noticed how much difference the larger blade made. I won't go back to the Stikine, in fact I'd go bigger personally. Just my experience so far.
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  Quote imageAK Replybullet Posted: 21 Feb 2017 at 1:31pm
the carbon foam core is gonna be less durable than a fiberglass blade, the larger surface area usually causes more fatigue also. ive been paddling with a sho-gun since I started and also used a few AT carbon paddles, a carbon powerhouse and a fiberglass powerhouse.

Ive actually been thinking about dropping down in size from the shogun to the stikine. If you don't bang your paddle up a lot and run more rivers than creeks id say the stikine would be a good choice.

I like the foam core cause it does better in aerated water than the solid carbon or fiberglass.. but Werner themselves say the fiberglass is the way to go for longevity.
aint nobody got time for that!
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huckin harms
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  Quote huckin harms Replybullet Posted: 21 Feb 2017 at 2:33pm
Ditto on what others have said. The larger the blade, the more stress to shoulders. You might consider the length also. Longer shaft provides more leverage.
I have both paddles, and very much prefer the foam core blade, maybe not as durable, but still a solid option.
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  Quote NateW Replybullet Posted: 21 Feb 2017 at 3:21pm
Door trim on a paddle blade sounds... interesting. I would think that might affect performance quite a bit. Paddles don't wear down all that quickly, I'd chuck that stuff and be willing to replace the blades every once in awhile.

Do you own a breakdown? I saw something on social media where you won a Werner paddle - is this why you are asking? If you don't have one, that's a no brainer get one of those.

Here is an interesting comparo from werner about the different paddle designs:
http://blistergearreview.com/features/20-questions-werner-paddles/2

That pretty much settles the arguments about what wears faster and what is tougher. Luckily I have not gone through many paddles, but I'm cheap so I think about how grouchy I will be when I have to replace it. I think it's pretty hard to beat a werner fiberglass paddle for the best mix of durability, performance, and relatively low cost ($200 online is pretty easy to find).
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  Quote Ellingferd Replybullet Posted: 23 Feb 2017 at 2:43pm
From my experience, I would recommend not getting a carbon shaft from Werner. I paddled all carbon werners for a long time and began developing elbow tendonitis which completely went away when I switched to an AT flexi. Werner's fiberglass shafts are great and will provide a good amount of flex, but their carbon shafts just don't work for me. They are incredibly stiff, which is what some like. I would switch back to werner if they offered a bent shaft fiberglass paddle, or if they developed a carbon shaft with a bit more flex. That's my two cents.
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chipmaney
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  Quote chipmaney Replybullet Posted: 23 Feb 2017 at 4:37pm
Blade size and shape will definitely affect your paddling. Bigger blades grab more water so give you more power. Bigger boof stroke. This may not be good if you have more physicality than technique. Also, it's more force on your body. I switched from the Shogun to the Stickine and noticed a significant difference in shoulder stress. Of course, I have questionable technique; good technique may make this a moot point.

Folks are correct, carbon vs fiberglass makes a huge difference. I prefer a super stiff blade so found going to a smaller blade was a good compromise instead of sacrificing stiffness.

In the end, it's really a matter of preference. big blade vs. small blade. stiff vs. flexible. Personally, I love my super stiff, smaller-bladed Stikine!
sitting all alone on a mountain by a river that has no end
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turtlepower
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  Quote turtlepower Replybullet Posted: 23 Feb 2017 at 8:00pm
Using automotive doortrim to cover the edge of the paddle blade doesn't seem to affect the performance from what I've seen & experienced. I got the idea after noticing a really talented paddler used it on his paddles. Foam core paddle blades are made up of laminate layers with a protective dynell trim along the edges. Even though the dynell is pretty hardy,rocks are even hardier and can wear down that protective coating which can cause a blade to "peel apart" or delaminate at the edges. Aquaseal some quarter inch door trim over the edge of the blade & get more life out of it.

Edited by turtlepower - 23 Feb 2017 at 8:03pm
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megspk
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  Quote megspk Replybullet Posted: 28 Feb 2017 at 1:07pm
Thanks for all the help everyone!! I ended up ordering the Stikine, can't wait to get SICK with it!! Cheers!
A strong person and a waterfall always channel their own path. -Unknown

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