Professor Paddle: Sam graftton?
Professor Paddle Professor Paddle
  RegisterRegister  LoginLogin
Home Calendar Forum FSBO Gallery PPages Reviews Rivers Trips Links
  Active TopicsActive Topics  Display List of Forum MembersMemberlist  Search The ForumSearch
Whitewater Forum
 Professor Paddle : General : Whitewater Forum
Message Icon Topic: Sam graftton? Post Reply Post New Topic
Page  of 2 Next >>
Author Message
imageAK
McNasty
McNasty
Avatar

Joined: 15 Aug 2014
Location: United States
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 357
  Quote imageAK Replybullet Topic: Sam graftton?
    Posted: 05 Nov 2014 at 7:56am
is he really on professorpaddle? haha just noticed the members signed in this morning and there was his user name! I need a mentor! Interested Sam? lol seriously though my friend constantly has other stuff to do so more often than not I find myself paddling alone(not ideal) and having to tap into the free solo courage just to step things up and run things that help me improve my paddling instead of skirting the mercy routes down river. I could really use someone willing to paddle often and down south here( im in chehalis) would be a major help. Someone with the experience to critique my technique so I can start running bigger water and class IV.

Edited by imageAK - 07 Nov 2014 at 5:33pm
aint nobody got time for that!
IP IP Logged Send Private Message
WA-Boater
Big Boofer
Big Boofer
Avatar

Joined: 30 Jun 2005
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 505
  Quote WA-Boater Replybullet Posted: 05 Nov 2014 at 10:25am
Sam's a great guy and paddler! If he gets down that way or vise versa I'm sure he'd give you some suggestions....

I'd also suggest that there are plenty of people around here that can provide just as good of advise or the critique you're looking for.

Keep your eyes out for:

Jed
JP
Scott/Fish
Ellie W
Totten
Jalmquist
SOPBoater - down in your neighborhood.
JD Gaffney
Jeff Robinson
The 'Rob McKibbin'
Mike & Irene Nash
Dan Patrinellis

I've learned a lot from these folks and many more over the years.

IP IP Logged Send Private Message Send Private Message
megspk
Big Boofer
Big Boofer
Avatar

Joined: 05 Jul 2012
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 540
  Quote megspk Replybullet Posted: 05 Nov 2014 at 11:20am
Since you are down in Chehalis have you looked into PDX kayaker? There's lots of boaters coming up from there to paddle the rivers in Southern WA. There are groups on Facebook too if you are into that. Be safe and smart dude when it comes to soloing!
A strong person and a waterfall always channel their own path. -Unknown

IP IP Logged Send Private Message Send Private Message
BIGWATER
McNasty
McNasty
Avatar

Joined: 04 Mar 2011
Location: United States
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 356
  Quote BIGWATER Replybullet Posted: 06 Nov 2014 at 7:30am
I don't mean to be rude, but I highly doubt you will be paddling with any of the above mentioned people near chehalis (although JP was with us on the Tilton) Most of them paddle up north and I doubt they want to run the class 2 / 3 that you should be working on. I would say Jared is your best bet for a local mentor. But really you need to work on the basics, some pool sessions would help a lot. You ran the class 2 section of the Tilton with us, but nearly swam the first 2+ rapid. Your gear is partly to blame, 90 degree paddle with half a blade missing, carharts over the wetsuit, and a go-pro. I say sell the go-pro and get a drysuit.
Again I'm not trying to be rude , this is reality. You have great energy and a desire to get into kayaking. But there is no magic person out there that will make you a class 4 boater if you don't have a bomb proof roll. Without a drysuit and a solid roll you are a liability to yourself and the group you are boating with. I'm not trying to discourage you, we need more paddlers down south! Next time I run something mellow I'll be giving you a call
Chris
IP IP Logged Send Private Message
imageAK
McNasty
McNasty
Avatar

Joined: 15 Aug 2014
Location: United States
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 357
  Quote imageAK Replybullet Posted: 06 Nov 2014 at 7:53am
the 90 degree paddle was given to me by jared and I replaced it the day after you guys asked me to hike out. and in retrospect I know exactly why I had to exit my boat instead of rolling.since then ive run the toutle at 2600 and 3000 in a dagger crazy 88(has helped my technique immensely) & the last leg of the west fork through covered bridge & had no issues except having to paddle alone. I dont think I got a fair shake on that first roll & was definitely bummed that I had to hike out & couldnt prove myself as well as I know how but meh next time will prove better.

Edited by imageAK - 06 Nov 2014 at 7:58am
aint nobody got time for that!
IP IP Logged Send Private Message
jalmquist
McNasty
McNasty


Joined: 07 Dec 2006
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 275
  Quote jalmquist Replybullet Posted: 06 Nov 2014 at 11:48am
If you jump through the hoop to get the permit to access the upper Chahalis drainage, I'll join you!    Next year when I'm not rehabing from shoulder surgery...  I always enjoyed those Chehalis runs.  Crim Creek!         

Edited by jalmquist - 06 Nov 2014 at 1:30pm
IP IP Logged Send Private Message Send Private Message
imageAK
McNasty
McNasty
Avatar

Joined: 15 Aug 2014
Location: United States
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 357
  Quote imageAK Replybullet Posted: 06 Nov 2014 at 1:44pm
ive already got a dialog going via email with the guy who works the permits for the tree farms in that sector possibly for some special access permits aside from the regular 400 rec permits they sell out of in august.
aint nobody got time for that!
IP IP Logged Send Private Message
jalmquist
McNasty
McNasty


Joined: 07 Dec 2006
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 275
  Quote jalmquist Replybullet Posted: 06 Nov 2014 at 2:33pm
Wow, you've done your homework.  Nice efforts!   
IP IP Logged Send Private Message Send Private Message
itchy
Paddler
Paddler


Joined: 11 Jun 2014
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 55
  Quote itchy Replybullet Posted: 06 Nov 2014 at 2:39pm
In my opinion, the best thing to do as a Class II-III boater to get better is to playboat... a lot. Almost all of the skills necessary for Class IV are most quickly learned by playboating in Class II and III, because you will spend much, much more time:

Catching/leaving eddies and ferrying (which are closely related), everytime you want to get on a wave. Even if you break apart rapids by catching as many eddies as possible when you are just running rapids (which you should do), you will do this more playboating.

Learning how to use your edges, when you are surfing and eddying out/ferrying. This includes both trying to stay upright and trying not to (squirts and cartwheels on eddylines, the best drug-free way to make Class I - III more fun). I will also include learning how to shift your weight in this category, for brevity.

Learning to deal with being in, and getting out of, holes: Self-evident.

Rolling! If you play hard, you will roll 10-50+ times in a trip, in a variety of types of current, and flipping from a variety of body/boat positions (i.e. different rotation axes). It is so much better to get a bombproof roll by playboating instead of just practicing in eddies by rolling on purpose, and flipping over in rapids that are closer to your limit.

Getting up on and over rocks: Wuut you said playboating. That's right, rock spins, splats, and splat wheels are super fun. Playboats also boof really well, and on very small features in addition to larger ones (until the hole at the bottom of the pourovers start to be really scary).

WA wins hands-down for having the most people in creek boats (and drysuits when it's 60 degrees out...) in Class III. It doesn't have to be like this! Get a playboat and spin and grin, squirt till it hurts! You don't have to be on the Ocoee to justify a playboat, there are always little waves and eddylines at the very least.
IP IP Logged Send Private Message
imageAK
McNasty
McNasty
Avatar

Joined: 15 Aug 2014
Location: United States
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 357
  Quote imageAK Replybullet Posted: 06 Nov 2014 at 2:51pm
Thanks for the advice! this is exactly what ive been doing after reading much the same thing online, a buddy let me borrow his playboat, which is definitely a park & play boat but ive been taking it down everything Ive paddle the past couple weeks. A bit intimidating compared to my big creek boat but its improved my paddle technique exponentially.
aint nobody got time for that!
IP IP Logged Send Private Message
Jed Hawkes
Rio Banditos
Rio Banditos
Avatar

Joined: 24 Aug 2008
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 806
  Quote Jed Hawkes Replybullet Posted: 06 Nov 2014 at 4:53pm
Originally posted by itchy

Catching/leaving eddies and ferrying (which are closely related), everytime you want to get on a wave. Even if you break apart rapids by catching as many eddies as possible when you are just running rapids (which you should do), you will do this more playboating.


Great point (soap boxing to follow, probably heard it from me before at least 90 times).

The Ferrying and eddy catching is the most commonly avoided skill of the introductory boater. I'm always telling introductory boaters catch as many eddies as you can and then see them drop into a rapid and not catch a single one. So what I guess I'm saying is that you have to be motivated and see the advantage to catching eddies and ferrying to actually do it.

When I was learning I would just drop in to a rapid and the only eddy to be caught was at the bottom. It's a common mistake and we're likely all guilty of it.

Whether your in your playboat or your creekboat, catch your eddies. A routine I have on runs that are below my skill level is to catch and eddy and then from that eddy identify another one on the opposite side of the river and imagine that there is a hazard in the middle of the river that I need to ferry above and then try and make that ferry to the opposite eddy while avoid this imaginary hazard. This is useful so when you find your self in a similar situation when it counts you feel comfortable making that move. If the first time you have to make a hairy ferry is the first time you run a class IV river your going to have a bad time.

Listen to Itchy, keep playboating, it's really great advice. Once you get your skill set up and start paddling with bigwater more watch that homie work the river. I swear he get's more for his dollar on the river than just about anyone I know.

Also, get a drysuit. If not for yourself for the people you paddle with this winter, dealing with a hypothermic person after a long swim sucks when the sun goes down at 4:00pm.
The line will become apparent
978-273-7723
IP IP Logged Send Private Message
imageAK
McNasty
McNasty
Avatar

Joined: 15 Aug 2014
Location: United States
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 357
  Quote imageAK Replybullet Posted: 06 Nov 2014 at 5:16pm
its definitely something my friend and main paddling partner hasnt learned to embrace yet. I see it as just as much fun as running the rapid though, to be able to pause and find that best line or avoid some of the gnar or just grab a cool micro eddy.
every time down the river I try to maximize my paddling, approaching features off angle or backwards or sideways to practice bracing and maneuvering or just to experience the shape of the features.

&&& a drysuit is on top priority hopefully ill have something functional in the next two weeks you know...
so i dont freeze to death since I certainly cant stop paddling.

Edited by imageAK - 06 Nov 2014 at 5:17pm
aint nobody got time for that!
IP IP Logged Send Private Message
irenen
Big Boofer
Big Boofer
Avatar

Joined: 24 Jul 2009
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 523
  Quote irenen Replybullet Posted: 06 Nov 2014 at 10:54pm
Check out Kayak Academy, they always have deals on drysuits (used and on sale). http://www.kayakacademy.com

(I am not affiliated. :)
It's all fun and games until someone loses a paddle.
IP IP Logged Send Private Message Send Private Message
FLUID
WW Industry
WW Industry
Avatar

Joined: 15 Jan 2007
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 276
  Quote FLUID Replybullet Posted: 07 Nov 2014 at 12:24am
Consider Jeds advise. The one thing that will progress you the quickest is amazing boat control. This will take you to the places where you want to go where your forced to eddy hop down class V looking for lines and staying out of trouble (while staying in your boat and having fun of course).

Big water is a great place to bomb rapids and runs you know really well because it does feel cool to flow with it, but in Washington creeking is the majority. Working on boat and edge control and catching your eddies in tough places is where you will find the skills to play the river, slow it down and navigate safely down class IV-V. I often see folks showing up on class IV+ runs with very little time in their creek boat. Take some time and train in the boat you want to progress in and known it well. Also staying upright and over your boat is just as or if not more of an important skill than rolling. You should count your rolls per quarter not per river. It's a crazy fact, but each class you progress you roll less and less... for good or bad?   

Good luck ! I may see ya on the Tilton, and if Jalmquist ends up getting out I for sure want to be there!

Edited by FLUID - 07 Nov 2014 at 12:43am
IP IP Logged Send Private Message Send Private Message
tiziak
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Avatar

Joined: 31 Aug 2008
Location: United States
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 1220
  Quote tiziak Replybullet Posted: 07 Nov 2014 at 9:34am

I know its a bit of a drive, but try to paddle the Skykomish as often as possible, and keep an eye open for Mike Harms. He and Dave Morales taught me how to creekboat, and both are a wealth of knowledge and skills.

Stick with it man. It's 90% mental and if you've got the guts to hike off a river and then get back in it higher, you'll be in Robe in no time.

 

Skills gained working the river (eddies, ferrying, etc) protect you but they also protect your crew. I feel we are safest when actively engaging the river in the manner we choose. By that I mean we are safest when surfing, ferrying, carving; anything where you are engaging and playing an active role in your destiny. sh*t gets crazy when you're off line or chasing your buddy down the river. I feel like this is where most compound issues arise. I tweaked my shoulder when I was getting so-and-sos boat to shore or "I got pinned while I was following that boat". Weve all had similar situations occur. That being said; never worry about swimming in front of your crew. Its part of the game we play, just pick your battles when you can.

 

Learn the skills everyone is hammering on, not only to be a better boater, but to be a better teammate. The trip is so much better when there are no cold booty-beers and/or lost equipment. Not to mention its always a plus to get off the river and look back, thinking you did an awesome job or gained/improved on some skill set. We have a very small and tight-knit community here in the PNW and there are not a lot of options to meet new people.

 

Talk to JP about flow. That man is plugged into the river like no one else. You can learn more from JPizzle about kayaking (and life) in one shuttle ride than I could tell you over a case of beer. Talk to Sam, if you like his style. This is one of the greatest attributes of kayaking; everyone is accessible for detailed questioning.  This is a pretty cool sport, where the hive actually works to make the individual better instead of vice versa. Its pretty cool to see in action and the long term effects on the group as a whole.

 

You've got the drive (it sounds like) now just practice and progress those skills! The only difference between class 2 and 5+ is mental attitude and quick problem solving.

 

And good beer. Never forget good beer.

 

 

If you don't know where you are going, any road will get you there.

Daniel Patrinellis
360.434.4616
IP IP Logged Send Private Message
Slackkinhard
McNasty
McNasty
Avatar

Joined: 23 Sep 2014
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 256
  Quote Slackkinhard Replybullet Posted: 07 Nov 2014 at 11:24am
Much in this post is of interest to me.  Thanks to everybody for their input.  I'm sort of in the same situation as imageAK. I'm addicted, and I can't wake up without trying to figure some way of ditching work and getting out on the water.  However that's a bit easier said than done. I'm not familiar with the rivers well enough to gauge flow and although I've been able to 'get down' a few rivers, I've also gotten in a bit over my head a couple times.  Now that my shoulder is reasonable again, I want to get out on the lower Sky to work on the ferrying/eddy techniques, but it's flowing pretty big right now. The lower Green is another option, but I'm not too sure what the right flows for someone like me would be.  I'm at the point I just wanna go sign up for a class or two, can't hurt I suppose :)

btw, I'll bring beer 


Edited by Slackkinhard - 07 Nov 2014 at 11:26am
IP IP Logged Send Private Message
Ellingferd
McNasty
McNasty
Avatar

Joined: 21 Jun 2005
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 417
  Quote Ellingferd Replybullet Posted: 07 Nov 2014 at 11:37am
As said earlier in this thread, playboating is really your best option for learning the kinds of boat control that many have talked about, and the quick thinking Dan just mentioned. There is an interesting aversion to playboating among the NW kayaking scene. Part of it is because there isn't much playboating to be had, but I think the other part of it is related to the amount of time it takes to get "good" at it, and this is ripe for debate at another time. However, the two primary skills needed to negotiate more difficult whitewater (an instantaneous roll and eddy catching abilities) are the two primary things necessary to playboat. Go to the Green and play at the takeout hole. You can do this yourself and it doesn't matter if you swim, you can easily clean up your own mess and walk back up to the hole. Rolling up behind that hole is probably one of the best simulations you can get to rolling in difficult whitewater without actually being in difficult whitewater due to all the swirlys and strange currents.

Once you have spent all winter doing that as well as boating easier class II and III runs, you should head to the Sky and start running boulder drop. If you really want to progress, you should run the drop multiple times when you are there. Walking back up not only works on fitness, but allows you to give it another go in order to immediately reinforce what you did well and gives you a chance to fix what you didnt do well. If you are serious about kayaking, you should be intimately acquainted with the Sky and Boulder Drop. It is, perhaps, THE best rapid for moving from class III to more difficult runs. This is not bullsh*t, do it.

You should be at the Wenatchee every weekend to playboat when it is above 5,000 cfs, and you should spend time at every playspot (more than five minutes). Many of the spots on the Wenatchee are tricky and require skill to shred in the 5k to 11k cfs range, but this means more flips and more flushes, which means more practice with boat control, edging, etc. I have no idea why there aren't more people at Granny's, Rodeo Hole, etc during the season. These are world class features that WILL teach you how to kayak. I spend hours at a time walking Granny's because it is a world class feature. I can't tell you how many people I see take one or two rides and then call it a day, and then wonder why they dont have a solid roll or why they "can't" playboat. Once it gets over 11k, don't bother setting shuttle and park yourself at Rodeo Hole ALLLLLL DAYYYYY. You can surf rodeo and then float down to trinity, and then walk back to your car. Rodeo at this level will teach you valuable skills for not only the physical aspect of kayaking, but the mental aspect because it is a big hole, and you have to WANT to play in it. It is intimidating, but so is class V. Trinity will also be valuable in learning skills because this is another large feature you have to want to surf, and will test your ability to quickly roll and get back to the eddy. Another thing to note about these big, powerful features on the Wenatchee: there is just about zero consequence to swimming other than inconvenience. Of course, you could always injure a shoulder, but if you have been following this program you should be in good shape once these features get pumping. Don't succumb to the pull of Peshastin creek, or at least don't ONLY head over there to paddle Peshastin, Ingalls, etc. Playboating at higher water levels on the Wenatchee will do way more for your progression than a 45 minute Peshastin run.

Just go surf the Wenatchee for cripes sake.

A few other things to note. If you have to think about your roll, you don't have a bomber roll and you should reconsider running anything over class IV, and even then you probably shouldn't be on runs like Canyon Creek Stilly. Go to the Sky. Your roll should be instantaneous and automatic. The only way to get this is to do a bunch of rolls. Go to pool sessions with the intent of 100 rolls on each side. Seriously. Do it. You WILL notice a difference if you do this. If you don't, you will only be practicing your roll on the river, which is not conducive to learning especially in the winter without a drysuit. There is no magic trick to the roll other than repetition resulting in muscle memory. Also, consider your level of fitness. If you are out of shape you have no business being on a run of any consequence. This is not a lazy man's sport despite the fact that beer drinking, for some, seems to be a primary objective while kayaking. To each their own, but I can tell you that the higher your level of physical fitness, the faster you will learn all of this crap. If you can't do more than five pull ups and the thought of running two miles makes you cringe, it might be time to step that up as well in order to make progression a lot easier.

Finally, all of the people mentioned in terms of paddling mentors are nice, skilled paddlers who are a wealth of knowledge and experience. Stay within your skillset, find a group of people looking to progress in the sport, and keep getting after it whether it is on the river, at a pool session, or getting a workout in with kayaking in mind. It all helps.

Jonathan
Wave Sport
IP IP Logged Send Private Message
Ellingferd
McNasty
McNasty
Avatar

Joined: 21 Jun 2005
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 417
  Quote Ellingferd Replybullet Posted: 07 Nov 2014 at 11:44am
Oh, and there is no such thing as a park and play boat! Ask Darren and Brock about Turnback Canyon and playboats......Or Rob about pretty much any run and the Kingpin.

Edited by Ellingferd - 07 Nov 2014 at 11:44am
Wave Sport
IP IP Logged Send Private Message
doggievacation
Super Looper
Super Looper
Avatar

Joined: 24 Oct 2006
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 170
  Quote doggievacation Replybullet Posted: 07 Nov 2014 at 3:52pm
Anyone who's new to WW and new to WA rivers should check out Arn's "Newbie Guide" from many, many years ago.

http://professorpaddle.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=4882

There's a great list of rivers/sections that will help you advance in the sport, as well as some general advice about technique.

Good luck to all!
Don't waste water!
IP IP Logged Send Private Message Send Private Message
imageAK
McNasty
McNasty
Avatar

Joined: 15 Aug 2014
Location: United States
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 357
  Quote imageAK Replybullet Posted: 07 Nov 2014 at 4:03pm
lol arns newbie guide was the first thing i read the day before i got my free pyrahna burn. my roll isnt bomber but thats because i havent dealt with it in big seems or large holes but ive not avoided rolling by any means. A lake two blocks away and rainbow falls dumping tons of water now that it rains i have been practicing enough to better understand rolling from any position and weak side. Now i just need to get the paddling in to have the experience to progress. cheers to everyone for the advice it will be heeded and used.
aint nobody got time for that!
IP IP Logged Send Private Message
BIGWATER
McNasty
McNasty
Avatar

Joined: 04 Mar 2011
Location: United States
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 356
  Quote BIGWATER Replybullet Posted: 07 Nov 2014 at 8:53pm
This thread has lots of good advice on paddling, but it's mostly centered on boating up north. The beauty of boating in Olympia and Centralia is you DONT have to drive north. Why would someone in Centralia drive 2+ maybe even 3 hours depending on the evil traffic one way to run the Sky.   The sky is nice and maybe you will meet some boaters, but for me the drive and the traffic just kills the day. If Andrew is boating the Toutle at 3k that's exactly where he should be and I hope to run it soon with him. I'm sure many of you have never been down the Toutle, why would you drive 2+ hours south through traffic for a 3/4 play run when the sky is so close, but it's got great play and is a perfect place to hone your skills and it's 30 mins or less from Centralia with no traffic. There are also many great class 3/4 runs on the Olympic much closer than the Sky or the Wenatchee.

On another topic, why do people say there is no playboating in WA? I hear it all the time....Washington is mostly creaking....I'm sorry but this is just not true.   Just because all you and your crew does is creakboat dosent mean that's all that WA has to offer. I have been playboating all over WA for years, and 95% of the time one of the epic play features is in, the small Oly playboat crew is the only one there. Like the other week when the Nassell wave was in, perfect flow all day....3 boaters, and 5 surfing ducks. There where more birds surfing that wave than people! Anyways I know downriver playboating had it's hayday in the late 90s and that it's all about running the nar now, but that dosent mean it's not still happening. There are lots of creek runs in WA, but there are just as many if not more playruns. The fact is we are blessed with a full range of rivers of all types and skill levels. It's all about what you want to do.

Edited by BIGWATER - 07 Nov 2014 at 9:15pm
IP IP Logged Send Private Message
imageAK
McNasty
McNasty
Avatar

Joined: 15 Aug 2014
Location: United States
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 357
  Quote imageAK Replybullet Posted: 08 Nov 2014 at 12:18am
woulda liked to see them burly surfing ducks! And I agree. out of all the people ive paddled with most have been in playboats. Ill prolly be paddling one down the toutle sunday.
aint nobody got time for that!
IP IP Logged Send Private Message
dave
Master Poster
Master Poster
Avatar
D4

Joined: 29 Apr 2005
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 4193
  Quote dave Replybullet Posted: 08 Nov 2014 at 6:53am
I learned how to kayak from a book John Almquist sold me back in the old days...it was a hard way to to learn....
Nomad
IP IP Logged Send Private Message
imageAK
McNasty
McNasty
Avatar

Joined: 15 Aug 2014
Location: United States
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 357
  Quote imageAK Replybullet Posted: 08 Nov 2014 at 9:13am
hopefully i can pickup something from him next year in the upper chehalis drainage. The senior land manager for the pe ell tree farm & myself have been chatting the past week &&& well lets just say hes an avid hunter & interested in hunting a piece of property I have over near cle elum & might afford me a special river access pass for that area!!!
aint nobody got time for that!
IP IP Logged Send Private Message
JoesKayak
Rio Banditos
Rio Banditos
Avatar

Joined: 07 Nov 2006
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 1204
  Quote JoesKayak Replybullet Posted: 08 Nov 2014 at 9:38am
Originally posted by imageAK

hopefully i can pickup something from him next year in the upper chehalis drainage. The senior land manager for the pe ell tree farm & myself have been chatting the past week &&& well lets just say hes an avid hunter & interested in hunting a piece of property I have over near cle elum & might afford me a special river access pass for that area!!!


That's great news. I got up to run the West Fork years back when the road was still open to general traffic. I hear people talk about "intro to creeking" runs a lot.. and I think a lot of the runs suggested are not very good choices for that. The west fork Chehalis is probably the best intro to creeking run I've been on. Lots of fun class 3 drops, most with recovery below them and a handful of harder ones, but nothing harder than 4-. If you have solid roll and skillset for running class 3 and someone with class 4 skills to run with you, you should love this run. It has all the features of full on 4-5 creek runs: ledges ad boulder gardens, but easier class 3 to 4- ones. Need some good rain though to bring it up.

The East fork is supposed to be pretty fun too and a little easier, but never got the chance to run it. The main fork Chehalis has a couple big burly drops on them (4-5).
IP IP Logged Send Private Message Send Private Message
Page  of 2 Next >>
Post Reply Post New Topic
Printable version Printable version

Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot create polls in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum